• CS to Go

WEEK 1 CHALLENGE

Updated: Apr 19



The Week 1 challenge is:


Use computer science to create something that will get you moving!

All of the challenges are purposely open ended -- use your creative genius to come up with an idea that matches with your interests and favorite things! 


The only limit we suggest is to ensure the content is appropriate for other kids; as we’re hoping you will be willing to share your projects publicly with the Code Savvy and greater #MNCodes community via our Flipgrid and/or by sharing a link on our Google Form (more info below on how to share).


Beginner: Scratch

Take a look at the following video for some ideas on how to use Scratch with this week’s challenge: Use computer science to create something that will get you moving!



Intermediate: Python

Take a look at the following video for some ideas on how to use Python on repl.it with this week’s challenge: Use computer science to create something that will get you moving!



unplugged

Take a look at the following video for some ideas on unplugged (no tech necessary) activities to try out to engage with this week’s challenge:Use computer science to create something that will get you moving!



next week's challenge

Next week’s challenge will get us thinking about our planet! 

And we will be adding Python, App Inventor, and more in the coming weeks. CS to Go with Code Savvy challenges will be shared via email, on the Code Savvy website and via social media on Monday evenings of each week. And be sure to subscribe to the Code Savvy YouTube Channel!


Share your CS to Go projects!


In the near future, we will invite CS to Go with Code Savvy participants to opt in to sharing your projects publicly with the Code Savvy and greater #MNCodes community via Flipgrid and/or Google Form.


Until our sharing feature is live, we encourage you to share and talk about your creations at home with your family members!


We can’t wait to see what you create! Please be sure to follow online safety guidelines and get adult permission before sharing.


Why computer science?


Knowing how to code, collaborate, and problem solve with computers are becoming vital skills—not only in business, but in art, media, academia, community organizing, and personal enrichment. These skills are relevant not only for college and career, but also for developing students’ social-emotional awareness, well-being, and ability to participate in and contribute to an increasingly digital society. Yet, Computer Science (CS) education is not equitably accessible in Minnesota's schools, and female-identifying students, low income students, and students of color are particularly underserved. Of the 1,480 Minnesota students who took the AP Computer Science exam in 2017-18, only 21% of students were female, 26% were eligible for free or reduced lunch programs, and 8% were students of color (AP College Board Program Participation Data, 2018).  For almost a decade, Code Savvy has been a leader in interrupting and counteracting racial and gender gaps in computer learning and access for young people. We’ve done that by coaching and supporting educators, and by creating accessible programs that help kids pursue their own passions, dreams, and careers.


Questions to ask your child about their projects:

  • Tell me about what your sprites are doing.

  • What was the hardest part about what you created?

  • How would you change your project for _____? (a different situation or audience, such as “a user who doesn’t see well” or “to use at school instead of home”)

  • Before this project I thought ____; now I think____.

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